This is the third of three early 19th century houses nestled within the medical complex on the way to the Ashley River. We've explored the other houses in the last two posts. Again, we're in a marshy area close to the saw and rice mills located close to the Ashley River.

The Lucas House is not dwarfed by the surrounding tall, sterile medical buildings; instead, this house stands out as elegant and imposing...

Did you know that the Town of Mount Pleasant has an Historical Marker Program? The program allows property owners to apply for Historical Roadside Markers for any property of historic significance within the town limits. The program is funded by the Town of Mount Pleasant Accommodations Tax and is administered by the Town of Mount Pleasant Historical Commission.

The mission of the Historical Marker Program is to identify and interpret places important to...

For history buffs and maritime aficionados, a Charleston vacation isn’t truly complete without a visit to Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum. Home to legendary World War II battleships such as the USS Yorktown, the museum is one of only two museums in the country that has more than two battleships, making it one of the most popular attractions in the Holy City.

Located in the top-rated city of Mount Pleasant on the beautiful Charleston Harbor, the museum offers visitors a chance to see Charleston’s magnificent monumental battleships up close and learn about the heroes aboard them. As the fourth largest naval museum in the country, you won’t be short on things to do at Patriots Point.

At Sea Island Builders, we often have potential clients ask us what kind of process we go through for bathroom renovations in Charleston and the surrounding area. We understand that it’s important for these potential clients to have a sense of how long the project will take, what they can expect of their custom remodelers, and what the completed project will look like, which is why we’ve put together this guide to the Sea Island Builders bathroom renovation process and included examples of our previous work.

268 Calhoun Street, an antebellum plantation-style house completed in 1846, was built by banker Edward Sebring. This striking Greek Revival building in the middle of the busy Medical University of South Carolina complex overlooked the Mill Pond across from what is now Calhoun Street. This was a marshy area in 1846 close to the saw mills. Sebring’s house was next door to the house we visited in last week’s post on 274 Calhoun Street.

Several weeks ago we looked at the column ruins of 131 Rutledge Avenue, now known as Cannon Park and named after Daniel Cannon, an owner of saw mills near this area. In fact, the area was named “Cannonborough” after him.

Around the corner on Calhoun Street is 274 Calhoun Street, a two and one-half story cypress double house, built by Daniel Cannon for his daughter. He began construction in 1802; unfortunately, Cannon died not long after construction was started, and the house was finally completed in 1815.

In the city of Charleston, there is history everywhere you look, and Hampton Park is no exception.

Located on the upper side of the Charleston peninsula, Hampton Park is Charleston's largest public park. Home to beautiful gardens, ponds, hiking trails, and more, the park is a charming place frequented by visitors and locals alike.

However, this wasn't always the case...

We're going back down Meeting Street to visit 60 Meeting, a three-story, pre-Revolutionary house that is still a single-family residence. Fortunately, we have an easy way to determine what 60 Meeting originally looked like. Simply look at the pink house on the Tradd Street side of 60 Meeting, and you'll see what the house looked like when it was first constructed. I frequently point out this difference between the two structures on my walking tours, as it helps people understand how drastically a façade can change depending on the style.

I visited The Charleston Museum recently at 360 Meeting Street; while I have been there several times, there are always new exhibits, and several of the permanent exhibits had changed. As I wrote last week, The Charleston Museum is the oldest in America, dating from 1773, and its collection is excellent.

On display are two of my favorites from childhood -- the Egyptian mummy and the whale skeleton. 

It’s easy to see why the city of Charleston attracts history buffs from across the nation. With its cobblestone streets, historic homes, and old plantations, the story of the Holy City runs deep throughout the Lowcountry and begs to be explored.
One of the best ways to experience a taste of Charleston’s rich past is by walking the city’s Museum Mile. This one-mile stretch of Meeting Street is full of nearby museums, nationally recognized historic homes, scenic parks, and stunning churches that have given the Holy City its moniker.

If you are lucky enough to live in Charleston, then the cultural sites along the Museum Mile can be explored at any time. However, those in a time crunch may have to be choosy about where they visit. Here are some stops that are highly recommended:

From my photograph you can see that there is no structure at Cannon Park; however, the site and remaining columns speak to a previous structure.

The property at 131 Rutledge Avenue was originally a pond, later filled in and donated in 1880 to the city as “Cannon’s Mall,” named after Daniel Cannon, an owner of saw mills near this area. Not long after the donation, Charleston hired Frederick Law Olmstead to draw up a landscape design for the property; Olmstead is a name associated with many of the city parks in the United States, notably Central Park in New York. He also laid out the grounds of the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina.

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