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Are you or your kids looking for something adventurous to do in Charleston? Fresh out of cool ideas, and needing to try something different? Do you want an outdoor experience that's both a mental and physical challenge? 
Why not get out and try the Challenge Course at Wild Blue Ropes Adventure Park? It's a completely addictive activity that Charleston locals and visitors of all ages enjoy!

Completing our exploration of Rainbow Row (79 East Bay at the corner of East Bay and Tradd Streets to 107 East Bay), we'll stop at 83 and 87 East Bay Street, both of which buildings have a connection to Susan Pringle Frost, founder of the Preservation Society of Charleston in 1920. Frost, who could trace her Charleston roots back to the early years of the settlement, was a court stenographer for many years. She was also a suffragette with a passion for saving Charleston's historic architecture. Being the first woman realtor in Charleston, Frost was in a unique position to realize that passion.

Improve your run…with rowing!

As spring gets closer so does race season in the Lowcountry.  For many of us, this winter’s cold weather has made it hard to start training.  Especially for those who made running a 5 or 10K a New Year’s resolution.
The Cooper River Bridge Run, Charleston’s largest race, is just a little over 8 weeks away and there are over 18 area races before then!
For most of us, training for a running race means running…

Continuing our exploration of Rainbow Row (79 East Bay at the corner of East Bay and Tradd Streets to 107 East Bay), today we'll stop at 95 East Bay Street. 95 East Bay was built around 1741 by Colonel Othniel Beale, whose residence I wrote about last week.

It's easy to point out Rainbow Row by the curved or Dutch-gabled roof of 95 East Bay, which stands out like a beacon among the rooftops of this row. The house has been renovated, yet retains fine Georgian interior elements. Like the others on this row, the landscaped garden behind the house is long and narrow.

A majority of seniors (nearly 90 percent, according to AARP) say they want to stay in their own home for a long as possible, and there can be many financial and emotional advantages to this choice. But this decision also can ultimately lead to social isolation, especially if a spouse, partner, or long-time friends and neighbors pass away or leave the home because they require inpatient healthcare services...

If you're a beer lover, you won't be disappointed in Charleston's craft beer scene. In the past few years, breweries have been popping up all over the Holy City, enhancing an already thriving food and beer culture.

Now, the only problem you might face is deciding which brewery you should visit first. If you are vacationing in Charleston and have limited time, you need to choose wisely.

To make things easier for you, here is your guide to the best breweries in Charleston

Mention "Rainbow Row" and most people know you're talking about Charleston. This colorful row of early structures extends from 79 East Bay Street at the corner of East Bay and Tradd to 107 East Bay. On my bus and walking tours, Rainbow Row is the one part of the city that everyone wants to see. The next few posts will concentrate on several of the Rainbow Row houses.

Written by Theresa on behalf of Bulldog Tours

At Charleston Food Tours we offer a variety of culinary tours of Charleston with knowledgeable tour guides and delicious samples of Lowcountry cuisine. Join us as we walk, talk and taste our way through history! Our mission is to promote local artisan growers and producers and to help preserve South Carolina’s rich culinary heritage. On our exclusive culinary tours, you will experience the Lowcountry’s distinctive food and warm hospitality. These informative tours are ideal for casual fans of the culinary arts or the hardcore foodie in your life. It would be difficult to find a southern city better suited for culinary tourism than historic Charleston, SC. Our tours include the Savor the Flavors of Downtown Charleston tour, the Savor the Flavors of Upper King Street tour, the Chef’s Kitchen tour and the Charleston Dessert tour.

9 East Battery was built around 1838 by William Roper, a wealthy cotton planter. If you're standing on High Battery, imagine that the 2 houses to the left of 9 East Battery don't exist, and you will have a sense of the landscape in front of this Greek Revival mansion. With no houses in front of it on East Battery until 1848, the Roper House with its massive columns was conspicuous to each ship entering Charleston harbor, a monument to Roper's wealth and stature.

1 East Battery was built around 1858 by Louis DeSaussure, a wealthy businessman of French Huguenot ancestry. Three stories high and built of brick covered with stucco, this house had an eye view of the Civil War. Approximately two years after the house was completed, South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union, and for the next several years, the occupants of 1 East Battery lived with the constant bombardment from the Union ships that made up the blockade behind Fort Sumter.

64 South Battery was built in 1772 by a wealthy shipping magnate, William Gibbes. A wonderful example of a Charleston double house (two rooms wide and two rooms deep) in the Georgian architectural style, 64 South Battery had a pristine view of the Ashley River. Today that view is gone, and it is difficult to imagine the original view with the landfill and houses that now stand in front of 64 South Battery.

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