This week we visit 28 Chapel Street in Wraggborough, another Greek Revival home built in Charleston's antebellum period. Over 6,000 square feet, 28 Chapel is two and one-half floors atop a raised basement. A lovely iron double curving staircase gracefully rises to the main piazza and entry with a fanlight above and sidelights on either side of the front door. The main piazza is comprised of Doric fluted columns; the second floor has no piazza but the door also has a fanlight and sidelights. As expected, this door is not as large or as impressive as the main door below. The third floor also has a fanlight in the center of the pediment.

This week we visit 20 Charlotte Street in Wraggborough, next door to last week’s post on 16 Charlotte Street built by merchant and planter Robert Martin. Martin built 20 Charlotte in 1848 for his daughter Ellen who married her second cousin, Joseph Aiken.

"Charleston is an extraordinary place. There is a deep connection between the residents and nearly three hundred and fifty years of history, and those ties between daily life and the distant past are strengthened by the occasional glimpse beyond the veil."
-- 
James Caskey, Charleston's Ghosts: Hauntings in the Holy City

Established in 1670, Charleston boasts a wonderfully rich and diverse history. However, its storied past also lends itself well to ghost stories and whispers of supposedly haunted dwellings.

Charleston International Airport has just announced some amazing news! Beginning in April of 2019, British Airways will be offering nonstop flights between the Charleston International Airport and Heathrow Airport in London.

16 Charlotte Street on the corner of Charlotte and East Bay Streets is an imposing structure that sold in 2016 for $4,950,000 million.

Just a few streets over from the Aiken-Rhett House on Elizabeth Street, 16 Charlotte is not quite as big a property, but is still extensive with the main three-story house alone over 9,000 square feet. There are two outbuildings in the rear, almost certainly dependency buildings; one outbuilding is 2,000 square feet with the other almost 3,500 square feet. We also see an Aiken family connection which tends to weave itself through the Wraggborough neighborhood.

We continue exploring the Aiken-Rhett House and outbuildings this week. This property is extensive, and Historic Charleston Foundation provides an excellent, user-friendly program for visitors to maneuver the main house, outbuildings and grounds.

As this is a museum house owned and operated by Historic Charleston Foundation, there is a $12.00 cost for adults; the cost is well worth the tour.

Although Charleston has countless historic cemeteries, few can rival the haunting beauty and rich history of Magnolia Cemetery. Located just off Meeting Street Road near Charleston’s Wagner Terrace neighborhood, this antebellum cemetery is full of gorgeous 19th century art and architecture, notable burials, native wildlife and much more.

CHARLESTON, S.C. -- For the eighth consecutive year, Charleston has been named the most popular city in the U.S., according to Condé Nast Traveler magazine. Results of the 31st annual Readers’ Choice Awards were announced today and will be celebrated in the November issue on newsstands October 16.

The Awards are widely regarded as the longest-running and one of the most prestigious recognitions of excellence in the travel industry. Nearly half a million Condé Nast Traveler readers submitted a recording-breaking number of responses evaluating their travel experiences. 

We will spend the next few posts visiting the area of Wraggborough, a section of Charleston which includes the Charleston Museum which we visited several weeks ago. The property of Wraggborough was owned and named for Joseph Wragg, the father of many children, each of which had a street in the section named for them. Wraggborough includes Elizabeth Street, Mary Street, Ann Street, Charlotte Street, Henrietta Street, Judith Street and John Street.

Of all the memorable fact and fictional couples through history I share during my Love Stories of Charleston walking tour, one of the most surprising tales doesn't exactly involve people, but rather a pair of guinea fowl who, as far as anyone can remember, simply appeared one day about 13 years ago and have simply never left. (Hey, they knew a good thing when they saw it. Charleston charms.)

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